Repairing or upgrading your bike! Look for items on UMB site Discussion board for bike fanatics! Visit the UMB store!
Css Menu Javascript by Vista-Buttons.com v4.3.0

Bonneville Shoreline Trail
Draper Section, Including Oak Hollow and Spring Hollow Trails

Seeming surprisingly "isolated" for a trail so close to civilization, the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST) on Draper's south mountain is a worthwhile ride. This section is 5.5 miles in length, from Coyote Hollow to the end near the Flight Park. The Shoreline itself has only 200 feet of absolute elevation change, but up-and-down riding yields about 600 feet of climbing. It's intermediate in technical requirement.

View east on the Shoreline Trail. The track is fairly narrow, with steep sideslopes. First review and photos by Bruce May 10, 2006. Updated information September 2016.

The eastern end of this section of the BST begins at Coyote Hollow in Corner Canyon. Arbitrarily, we'll start the trail discussion at the eastern end, riding east to west.

From the trailhead it's about 100 feet to connect to the BST. Downhill and east takes you on the Corner Canyon BST section. Uphill (a right turn) takes you on the westbound BST.

Climb 1/10th mile up to the T intersection. Here Clark's Trail is on the left, climbing up to Ann's Trail near the Peak View trailhead on Traverse Ridge. Fork to the right on the BST.

Climbing up from the Coyote Hollow trailhead, back when the trail was freshly cut. Big thick maples and oak.

The trail must climb up and around the homes south of the Draper Temple. So your climb will continue on a gradual incline as you skirt a small valley. You'll gain about 150 vertical feet over the next half mile.

Once you're above the homes, you'll reach your first connection opportunity, Potato Hill. This trail climbs 0.5 miles to Ann's Trail for loop rides, or 0.7 to the Potato Hill trailhead on Traverse Mountain road. The loop combining Ann's Trail and the BST is tough but popular.

Keep level and right to stay on the BST.

Alex, coming from the west, approaches the Potato Hill trail fork on the BST. Photo May 2014.

After getting past the "castles on the hill," the BST can descend again. You'll coast through a set of long switchbacks on a gentle 100-foot vertical descent, then resume a rolling ride westbound.

About 0.9 miles after the Potato Hill fork, you'll pass the second half of the Potato Hill circuit, Red Potato. This trail also connects to the Potato Hill trailhead, 0.7 miles uphill.

Alex drops down Red Potato toward the BST.

Now you'll skirt the Red Rock area, about 1/4 mile west from the Red Potato trail fork. Here a trail comes up to the BST from the Red Rock trailhead parking on Mike Weir Drive. This connector downhill (on your right) is only about 200 feet long.

The trail that goes uphill on your left is for foot-traffic only. You're welcome to lean the bike against a tree (off the trail please) and walk uphill to see what that's all about.

To get to the Spring Hollow Trail, you'll need to go down the connector to the Red Rock parking area. Make a hard right turn as you drop into the trailhead, then pedal all the way to the far east end of the parking lot. Go across the bridge, then -- watching carefully -- dodge the traffic in the crosswalk to get over to Spring Hollow.

Looking at Red Rock from the west.

Spring Hollow is narrow and occasionally technical due to gambel oak roots. Unless it's seen some TLC, I'd rank it as upper-intermediate. Spring Hollow skirts the golf course as it descends. The trail ends on Vestry Drive 0.8 miles downhill -- without further singletrack connections. (Note that the Oak Hollow trail starts on Vestry Drive to the west.)

We're descending the Spring Hollow Trail. There's some open area like this, as the trail flirts with a few greens of the golf course. There's also forested riding.

After a short distance of traverse from Red Rock, the BST descends and crosses Mike Weir Drive at a crosswalk. Now that you're on the downhill side of the road, the trail rolls and winds around small drainages. Some areas get a little loose with cobble -- old river rock from Lake Bonneville.

Alex swoops along  on the BST.

0.8 miles after crossing the paved Mike Wier road, the trail approaches the Traverse Mountain Road. As you near the trail underpass, the Oak Hollow trail forks to the right. Oak Hollow descends 0.8 miles to the Draper Pool area.

An excellent short loop ride is to park at the Draper Pool (Vestry Drive, just east of the roundabout) and climb Oak Hollow. Go left on the BST instead of tunneling under the road. Drop off the Shoreline at the Mike Weir trailhead to go downhill on Spring Hollow. Now take Vestry back to where you parked. (Note: when you reach Vestry Drive on Spring Hollow, you can either jog right 50 feet to find the trail downhill to Highland Drive, or turn left on Vestry to head back to the pool. If you jog over to find the continuing trail, it takes you down a fenced chute between several back yards, then connects with the sidewalk along Highland Drive.)

We're climbing up the Oak Hollow Trail toward the BST. Despite traversing an area thick with homes, the connector trails feel private and isolated.

To continue a westbound BST ride, turn to the left at the Oak Hollow fork and go under Traverse Mountain Road. Cross the dry creek and climb north back to a shoulder above the road. Here you'll reach the fork for Ann's Trail.

Pedaling Oak Hollow.

Ann's Trail, sometimes called the Draper Rim, climbs high on the mountain and circles back to the east. After 700 vertical feet, you can take Ann's Connector to Eagle Crest, or continue east to Potato Hill or the Peak View trailhead (the top of Rush and Clark's).

To continue with the BST, keep to the right and head west.

View of Timpanogos and the mountains east of Alpine, seen over the ridge from Ann's Trail. You can see the trail's course at mid-mountain on the left of the photo.

From the Ann's Trail intersection, the BST will continue another 2.2 miles along the side of the mountain. This area can be more narrow and technical because it sees less traffic, and usually less maintenance. But don't skip this part, because it's a scenic and fun ride -- plenty of miles without too much work.

Oak Hollow, Pool to Tunnel: 0.8 miles
Tunnel to flight park: 2.6 miles
Connector Oak Hollow to Mike Weir: 0.9 miles
Mike Weir crossing to Mike Weir trailhead: 0.5 miles
Mike Weir trailhead to east end: 0.9 miles
Spring Hollow, Weir to Vestry: 0.8 miles
Vestry to Pool: 1 mile

Looking west towards the Oquirrh Mountains. We've heading west toward the gliding park.

Getting there:  To start at the Draper Pool, leave I-15 at the Bluffdale exit and go east. Just after climbing the long hill, you'll come to a light. Go straight, then take the next right turn at Vestry Drive in 0.5 mile. Roll around the roundabout to go left, then turn into the pool parking. To start the ride, head back to the roundabout and find the trail on the uphill-southwest side.
Red Rock (Mike Weir) trailhead: Leave I-15 and climb the hill as above, but turn right at the light on Traverse Mountain Road. After one mile, turn left onto Mike Weir Drive. The trailhead parking is on your right, 1/2 mile later.
Coyote Hollow trailhead: Take the Bluffdale exit from I-15 and turn east towards the mountains. Climb the hill as above, but turn right at the light on Traverse Mountain Road. After one mile, turn into Mike Weir Drive on your left. Pass the Mike Weir trailhead 1/2 mile later and continue another half mile until the road veers left downhill. Take the next right turn, turn right again, then left. You should now be on Gray Fox Drive. Take the next right into Coyote Hollow Court. The parking is on the right at the end of the pavement.
Riding Resources for these trails:
  Load above map in new window for printing:  View map
  Single-page riding guide for printing.
  Lodging, camping, shops:    Links to southern SLC resources
  Corner Canyon area trail overview page
GPS track files (right-click and "Save as..."):
     GPX track file    Multi-track Draper Area file
Go to Draper Area Trails overview page

Copyright 2006 UtahMountainBiking.com